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Search Warrants

Florida Search Warrants – Understanding Your Rights

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Search Warrants

A search warrant is a court order that a magistrate or judge issues to authorize law enforcement officers to conduct a search of a person, location, or vehicle for evidence of a crime and to confiscate any evidence they find. In most countries, a search warrant cannot be issued in aid of civil process.

The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution states, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” 

Law enforcement are required to obtain a search warrant before entering your home. If you have been asked to have your home searched, it is important to know your rights.

How Do Police Obtain a Search Warrant?

A law enforcement officer must request a search warrant from a judge or magistrate by providing probable cause for the search warrant. A judge must be convinced there is a high probability that evidence can be found at the property law enforcement wishes to search. The search warrant must also specify what items law enforcement will search for. Law enforcement is limited to searching places those items may be located.

When Is a Search Warrant Not Required for Law Enforcement to Conduct a Search of Your Home?

There are a few exceptions to the Fourth Amendment that do allow law enforcement to search your home or property without legally obtaining a search warrant. 

The following are the exceptions:

  • If there is Consent – If law enforcement want to search your home and do not have enough time or probable cause to obtain a search warrant from a judge, you have the right to consent to the search. Once consent is given, a warrant is no longer required. It is important to consult with your defense attorney before consenting to any searches of your property. Consent is the most common exception to the search warrant requirement.
  • Plain View – If you open your door to law enforcement and there is illegal contraband in plain sight, an officer is no longer required to obtain a search warrant to conduct a search of your home or property. When law enforcement notices illegal contraband, you have essentially consented to a search.
  • Incident to an Arrest – When law enforcement make a lawful arrest, the area where the suspect has been arrested is permissible to search without a legal search warrant,
  • Emergency – If law enforcement hear screams or shots, they may enter a home without legally obtaining a search warrant.

Ronald Chapman

If you have been arrested and believe your rights have been violated by being subjected to an illegal search,  contact Ronald Chapman. Ronald Chapman is an  experienced defense attorney who knows the ins and outs of the Florida criminal court system and is dedicated to his clients. Ronald Chapman can help you with your case.

Ronald Chapman practices criminal defense in both State and Federal Courts within the State of Florida. Since 1990, Mr. Chapman has been representing people accused of committing various types of crimes. If you are facing criminal charges in Florida, Ronald Chapman can help.

Schedule your FREE Consultation! Call (561) 832-4348 or visit his website.

 Visit us at https://www.justiceflorida.com/ You can also connect with the West Palm Beach Criminal Defense Office online today! Ronald Chapman, an experienced criminal defense lawyer, dedicated to defending your rights. Contact him today to begin to discuss your case.

 

 

Ronald S. Chapman, P.A.
400 Clematis Street, Suite 206
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-832-4348

 

 

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